Indemann

Clare and Rob at the Indemann

Today we went to the Indemann. The rest of the family had been there before, but this was my first time. It is a large metal structure about 150 feet tall in the shape of a man, in the town of Inde. From the top you have a great view of the gigantic coal pit nearby, and the power plant which uses the coal from it.

Germany has pledged to stop using coal by 2038. In the meantime, there are still some very large active brown coal mines near us, which continue to eat up little villages. According to some of the signage we read that 7,500 people have been displaced because of it (not that many compared to the 1.3 million people displaced by the damming of theYangtze River in China) . When the mining is all done, they will turn the pit into a lake, which they have done in several other places in Germany, with quite a bit of success. It is very interesting to see the coal pit right next to windmills and solar panels – very much a view into the past and future of energy production.

The Indemann is a very interesting mix of art installation, viewing platform, and theme park – there is a large playground, a mini-golf course, and a soccer golf course. Spencer and I played a round of mini-golf. During Covid-19 times, it is required to wear a face mask to ascend the structure, which Clare and I did. The kids forgot their face masks at home, but weren’t that interested anyways, so they played on the playground.

Rheinfels Castle

On our trip to the Lorelei and the Romantic Rhine, we got to visit Burg Rheinfels, the ruins of a medieval castle. It has the largest vaulted cellar in Europe, formerly used for holding wine. It took hundreds of years for the French to successfully take the castle, so it must be good. Or the tariffs of the river traffic were worth strong fortification. The view isn’t bad either.